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Which one is correct, “intend on doing something” or “intend doing something”?

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Which one is correct, “intend on doing something” or “intend doing something”?

What’s the difference?

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2 Answers

  1. The second is correct; the first is ungrammatical but can be corrected by replacing “intend” by “intent”.

    Emeritus Professor Rodney Huddleston, co-author with Professor Geoffrey Pullum of “The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language”, Cambridge University Press, 2002.

  2. The difference is that “intend doing something” is simply not correct. “Intend to do something” would be the best way to say it, with “intend on doing something” being a little awkward here but acceptable.